Website Main |  Product Catalog |  Shop for Fruitflies |  About Fruitflies |  About Silkworms |  Shipping Info |  Links |  Contact Us
 
The Fruit Fly Shop's FAQ

  Index:
How do I care for my fruit flies?
How long will the fruit fly culture last?
How do I feed the fruit flies to my pets?
Are fruit flies better than other feeders?
Do your products come with a guarantee?
How do I care for my silkworms?
How long will the silkworm food last?
My silkworms are just the right size. Can I stop feeding them?
Are silkworms better than other feeders?
My Silkworms aren’t eating or moving. What’s wrong?
Can I feed silkworms other types of plant leaves?
My silkworms are dying. What am I doing wrong?

  Can't Find What You're Seeking? Email Us With Your Question

How do I care for my fruit flies?

Caring for your fruit fly culture is very easy. Basically, you don't have to do anything. The fruit fly culture is completely self-contained and needs no cleaning or special care.

Larvae will continually pupate from eggs laid by the adults in the culture. It is important to keep at least 25-50 adult flies in the culture. These adult flies will be busy laying more eggs and ensuring that you will have a successful and constant supply of flies. It is also important to feed the flies to your animals regularly so the flies don't reach the natural end of their lives and pollute the substrate. It is best to keep the fruit fly culture at room temperature (around 70° F). The higher the temperature, the higher the bacterial growth. But, you may want to raise or lower the temperature to control the lifespan of your culture (see next section).


How long will the fruit fly culture last?

The fruit fly culture will last for about a month (until all the food has been consumed).

However, it is possible to control the lifespan and production rate of your fruitfly culture. By controlling temperature, it's possible to control the rate of reproduction. Optimum reproductive rate occurs at temperatures of approximately 80° F. At around 60° F, reproductive rate slows, thus allowing longer feeding time and longer use from a single culture. Obviously, the more flies you use, the higher you will want the reproductive rate to be.


How do I feed the fruit flies to my pets?

When it's feeding time for your pets, tap the container lightly on something hard. This will cause the fruitflies to fall to the bottom of the container so they won't escape when you take the lid off. Then, simply remove the lid and tap the container over your animal's home until the desired number of fruit flies fall out. If dusting the flies with vitamins, tap them into a plastic bag and dust.

Are fruitflies better than other feeders?

Fruit flies aren't necessarily better than other feeders. The great thing about fruit flies is their size. They can be feed to all types of aquarium fish or to small spiders and pet insects. Fruit flies are also excellent to use as a feeder for small or newborn reptiles and amphibians. Previously, pinhead crickets were one of the few alternatives to feed to small and newborn pets. But, by including fruit flies in their diet, you are increasing the variety of their diet, and that's a very good thing in order to ensure that your pet stays healthy.

How do I care for my silkworms?

Caring for your silkworms is very easy. Upon arrival, place the silkworms in a larger plastic container if they are overcrowded. Feed your worms with either mulberry leaves or pre-made silkworm food (sold separately). A cheese grater is the best method for distributing the food evenly, but you can also break the food into smaller pieces. Grate some food directly onto the worms and replace the lid to prevent the food from drying out quickly. If condensation develops, vent the lid

Before feeding again, take the lid off until the old food and droppings dry out. If your worms are the desired feeding size upon arrival, you do not need to feed them. They will stay alive for a week or more (depending on temp. and size) without food. Repeat this feeding procedure until the worms reach the desired size. Obviously, the more you feed them, the faster they will grow.

As the silkworms grow and become crowded, transfer them to a larger plastic container.
The lid you are keeping the worms in needs to have ventilation holes. If not, you need to vent the lid so the silkworms won't suffocate and to allow condensation to dissipate. You may need to separate them into more than one container, depending on the number and size. Handle the worms with extreme care, as they bruise easily. Most of the worms will be clinging to a layer of silk, old food and droppings. You do not need to separate the worms from the material they are clinging to as long as it is dry.

For optimal growth and health, keep your worms at a temperature of 75°-88° F.


How long will the silkworm food last?

Keep the food in the refrigerator in an airtight container, wash your hands before handling, and the food will last for up to a month.

My silkworms are just the right size. Can I stop feeding them?

Yes. Once the silkworm is past the larva stage, you may stop feeding, and the worms will live without food for a week or longer (depending on temperature and size). It's a good idea to feed them every few days to extend this "hold" period.

Are silkworms better than other feeders?

Yes. Click Here to learn 11 reasons why silkworms are an excellent critter to feed your pet.

Click Here to learn about the nutritional value of silkworms compared to other common feeders.


My Silkworms aren't eating or moving. What's wrong?

This is normal, and actually means that your worms are healthy and growing. A Silkworm’s only job is to eat and grow, but because their soft skins do not stretch as they grow, the worms must shed their skins. They will molt 3 to 4 times during growth. If your worms aren’t eating and are sitting still (especially with their heads raised in the air), they’re getting ready to molt. Your worms will spend one or two inactive days just before molting.

Can I feed the silkworms other types of plant leaves?

No. Silkworms can ONLY survive on mulberry leaves (genus Morus), sometimes Osage orange (Maclura pomifera) or silkworm food which is made from mulberry leaves. Your worms may eat other types of vegetation, such as lettuce leaves, but it will kill them.

My silkworms are dying. What am I doing wrong?

Excessive condensation forming in the container after feeding is the leading cause of failure. In order for your worms to stay healthy for many weeks, you'll need to keep the silkworms as dry as possible. If condensation builds up during feeding, vent the container lid to prevent excess humidity. In order to increase air exchange, instead of an lid, you can also use several layers of paper towels secured around the container with a rubber band.

Mold develops from high temperatures and high humidity. If the worms are covered with droppings, silk and old food for too long, mold may develop and kill the worms. If mold does develop, grate about 1/4 inch of food (sold separately) all over the worms with a cheese grater. As the worms crawl to the top of the new food pile you can transfer them off the moldy food and place them into a new container.

Be sure to wash your hands thoroughly before handling the worms or their food. Silkworms are sensitive to bacteria if you don't properly handle them. The droppings and uneaten food become a suitable germ-free mat for the worms to hold onto, as long as the container environment remains dry.

Silkworms are susceptible to bruising and dying if now handled with care, especially as they grow larger. When handling and transferring the worms, be very gentle.

 
HOME |  Shop for Fruitflies |  About Fruitflies |  About Silkworms |  Shipping Info |  Links |  Contact Us